If you’ve fallen into the role of a caretaker, then you don’t want to have to worry about being discriminated against because of it. Taking care of your family member is hard enough without that additional stress. Fortunately, a new bill in California will help protect caregivers like yourself from workplace discrimination, which could save your job or protect you against discriminatory pay losses or the loss of promotions.

The Feb. 17 report claims that this legislation is pending in California and New York at the present time, and it could work in your favor. The bill will safeguard employees against employment discrimination due to their status as a caregiver. This doesn’t only apply to those taking care of their parents or disabled family members; it would also protect mothers and fathers who may have to miss work due to their children’s needs.

The news reports that in one case, a woman claimed she lost her job because she couldn’t get nighttime care for her 11-year-old daughter. She claimed that she asked to switch to other hours, since the job had switched her from day to night hours, but was refused every time she asked. She believes that other workers were getting their schedules switched for school, but her boss wouldn’t do the same thing for her.

At that time, there was no law against this kind of discrimination, but there may soon be. People who want the new bill to pass claim that the demographic trend of single-parent households and households with both parents working has made it more important to protect against this kind of discrimination. Additionally, it will also protect those who need to take care of elderly family members.

In older generations, it may have been normal to have one stay-at-home parent, but today things have changed. Schedules can be unpredictable and hours can be excessive. With the new bill in place, it could be the first time caregivers can be sure they won’t be discriminated against for the things they have to do.

Source: Spokesman-Review, “Bills would protect caregivers from discrimination” No author given, Feb. 17, 2014