Detective accuses fellow officer of abuse, rape and revenge porn

| Jan 3, 2019 | Employment Law |

Romantic relationships between colleagues can occur in just about any line of work — including law enforcement. When they go bad, they can become a serious workplace issue. The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is dealing with not only accusations of workplace impropriety but violations of the law.

A female detective with the department’s Robbery-Homicide Division is accusing a senior lead officer of distributing nude pictures of her to others in the LAPD after she ended their relationship last August. She’s also sought a temporary restraining order (TRO) against the officer, with whom she says she was romantically involved for five years.

The detective accuses the officer of being physically abusive at times during their relationship. She says that he raped her twice and struck her in the head on two occasions. She also reportedly has threatening texts from him, including one that says, “Retire now…I’ll make sure you do…you won’t be able to look anyone in the eyes soon.”

To complicate matters further, that detective is married to a former assistant LAPD chief who retired last year amid a sex scandal of his own involving a subordinate officer. Undercover LAPD officers reportedly caught the nearly 30-year veteran of the force having sex in a parking lot with the officer.

The attorney for the officer facing a TRO denies that his client took the photos. However, he added, “Even if he did it — and I’m not saying he did — it’s academic anyway if one voluntarily participated in such photographs…” The detective’s attorney, however, notes that revenge porn (which typically involves distributing or posting explicit images of a former boyfriend or girlfriend without their permission) is illegal.

Sexual harassment allegations can get complicated if two people had a consensual relationship at some point. However, sexual harassment can occur after a relationship has ended. If the relationship is between a manager and subordinate, it could be argued that, by definition, it can’t be consensual. Whatever the situation, if you believe you’ve been the victim of sexual harassment or any type of workplace harassment, it’s wise to find out what legal options you have.

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